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: fresh protests in egypt, as angry demonstrators clash with police for a third day, after president morsi claims that new rules all but exempt him from balances. the egyptian stock market falls amid fears of balance. i'm shannon bream, live in washington. america's news headquarters begins with the latest from cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who support president morsi and think he is doing what needs to be done. and those who think he is making a power
override any decision that has been made by morsi and that will be made by morsi. in a way, he is trying to create an imperial rpresidency, an imperial presidency that basically anoints morsi as the supreme lead over egypt, period. he monstrously miscalculated. he has thrown egypt into a political and constitutional crisis. he has finally succeeded in unifying the fractured opposition. now not just the liberals and the nationalists and the leftists. millions of egyptians are outraged in morsi addressing his own office of absolute authority. >> that's the question i have though. this has sparked massive protests as we can see. he is now -- you know, he's standing his ground but he also seems to be giving a little ground. is there cause in your view, maybe from our viewpoint, western standpoint, to take a step back and let this play out a little bit before cle clairing egypt's great democracy is over. is there a chance that by the owned the day there will be a resolution and could maybe strengthen democracy? >> i have no doubt in my mind that this is an egyptian crisis. egyptians must take
erupting in egypt after president muhammad morsi grants himself new and far-reaching powers. live pictures as the president speaking right now. that's muhammad morsi, as hundreds of egyptians are protesting in tahrir square today. morsi's opponents clashing with supporters in cities all over egypt. we're now hearing protesters storming the office of the muslim brotherhood and throwing out books and chairs and other things onto the streets. steve harrigan streaming live from cairo with the latest. hi, steve. >> reporter: gregg, behind me we're seeing the start of violence at this major demonstration in cairo. you see crowds off to my right, the tens of thousands who have gathered here beginning to run. we've seen tear gas fired as well as molotov cocktails. this big crowd here today, the biggest we've seen in some time, is really in reaction to what the new egyptian president did yesterday, muhammad morsi issuing some stunning information, first, that any decree he issues will be legal and that any declaration he issues is final and cannot be appealed by anyone, including the courts. the ne
president mohamed morsi's decision to broaden his power. it is the second day of protest. nbc's jim maceda is live for us in cairo. jim, good day to you there in cairo. what's going on this morning? >> hi there, alex. it's kind of a festive atmosphere down below me there on tahrir square. several hundred people chanting, marching, but the flag -- the tents are out. some of the stands are out. the tea man is out. it's a bit reminiscent of how it was almost now two years ago. and egyptians, you know, seem more divided than ever, alex. for many here their elected leaders -- or i should say the elected leader morsi himself has just driven a wedge deeper and even wider. at dawn there were more tents than protesters on tahrir square. ground zero for last year's uprising. but that didn't stop clashes with police on approach roads where protesters blocked traffic, defying president mohamed morsi's orders. after morsi declared sweeping powers for himself, leaving him above the law. "we are here because the goals of the revolution have yet to be achieved" said this protester. morsi told the supporte
to prevent an escalation of the conflict is in cairo to meet with egyptian president mohamed morsi who is key to brokering any deal. it's her final stop on an emergency round of shuttle diplomacy that also include meetings in israel and the west bank. for the latest nbc's stephanie gosk joins us and ayman mohyeldin. a report of a tel aviv bus explosion. is there any indication that the israelis now are looking at possibly having a short-term truce or want to hold out long er for a longer deal? >> reporter: well, we don't have a truce. there's a lot of talk yesterday that there would be one, and then this morning, today around lunch time this bus attack. and what we know about it so far is that they're saying it's a terrorist attack, it's not a suicide attack. we were down there earlier today and the security officials were very nervous. they were pushing us back. they thought maybe there were more explosives on the bus. it turned out there weren't. this tactic will be very familiar to people in this city and around israel. it was used about a decade ago frequently all over the kcountr during
and breaking news. jon: there are massive protests in egypt right now against president mohammed morsi's latest power grab. as anger grows the muslim brotherhood announces plans for its own demonstration. >>> police combing a million dollar mansion for clues after a violent home invasion. >>> plus there is still time to try your luck as the powerball jackpot hit as record 500 million smackers. it is ail "happening now." jon: think if that half a billion buck is not enough to touch the national debt. jenna: i like when you say smackers. that gets us into the lottery. jon: day two of crucial meetings on capitol hill. i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. susan rice is meeting with support bob corker of tennessee. she just wrapped up talks with susan collins of maine. that topic is benghazi. what did ambassador rice know about the terror attacks on the u.s. consulate that killed four americans on september 11? she faced a lot of criticism for comments made in the days following the attacks blaming it on a demonstration that got out of hand. by the way she wasn't the only one. that is something we h
egyptian president mohammed morsi basically saying you know that judiciary that we have? you know the judges that we have? if i make a decision, they are not going to be able to review anything that i do anymore. essentially cutting out the judiciary becoming by all accounts a dictator. >> yeah. all the checks on his power were essentially removed. and it did appear that this guy became a dick day or two overnight. what was worrisome about it is how quickly it all happened. and basically a 12 to 24 hour span after the united states congratulated mohammed morsi on doing such a great job helping to broker a peace agreement between hamas and israel which may beer maybe not. maybe he did a great job. there are also arms being smuggled through egypt so maybe he got too much credit. >> he seized the day. his name is on top of all newspapers. here i am, i need to consolidate power this morning. >> charles krauthammer believes there is a connection between the praise that came from the united states and what president morsey has done now in egypt. >> i'm not surprised at all that the brot
from president morsi, but he -- and she was able to give him credit for that, which i think was very important along with prime minister netanyahu. and i think it actually made the difference between having a cease-fire, even though it is tenuous to be the groundwork for future talks. >> you know, congresswoman, so it did make the difference but then why is it that you think senators john mccain and lindsey graham cannot seem to give the president even the smallest bit of credit when, you know, this is his foreign policy, this is what he talked about in terms of diplomacy over sabre rattling, and it's working? >> unfortunately, senator mccain and senator graham remind me of the kids on the playground and they need to be put in time-out. what we know is that it was important, actually, for the president and for secretary clinton to are the space they needed without all the commentary from u.s. elected officials to conduct what was a really important and catalytic diplomatic moment. >> you know, talking about having the space to actually do their jobs, republicans have been hammering t
security adviser steve hadley. >>> plus a new wave against president morsi. >>> and two indianapolis colts cheerleaders save their hair in support of their coach's fight against leukemia. >>> good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. congress is back. grover norquist's tax pledge could be history. and all eyes are now focusing on house republicans as talks to avoid going over that so-called fiscal cliff are picking up steam. joining me now, mark halperin, senior political analyst for "time" and msnbc and ruth marcus, columnist and editorial writer for the "washington post." to you, mark, what is your read about what we've been hearing the last couple of days about grover norquist, the pledge and how much running room the speaker does have to b negotiating a deal. >> i did a spit take with my fruity pebbles watching "morning joe" because eric cantor's tone was unlike anything i've ever heard. his office is saying oh, no, he's against raising marginal rates, but it's clear that in the scheme of things, the biggest piece is does john boehner have enough running room to strike a deal i
these protests. is it all over morsi granting himself these further powers? >> reporter: yes, alex, it is about that. he came out, by the way, a good hour ago to talk, to speechify about the presidential powers. that's about four or five miles away from what you're describing, which is at tahrir square, the famous tahrir square. morsi spoke to his supporters saying that he had to do this to break really what is a log jam in writing up a new constitution. he was saying much of the judiciary are very honorable people but there are five or six or seven bad eggs, if you will. these are remnants of the mubarak regime and they're constantly interfering with the process. meanwhile, the country is continuing to be mired in poverty, a lack of social justice and what have you. so he says to protect the revolution, to protect the principles of the revolution and to protect this country's forward movement towards democracy he needed to do this to keep the constitution and the writing of the constitution moving forward. >> now, jim, if he does this, it's been reported he says he will do this just as long as
egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all the demonstrators angry after president morsi declared some controversial decrees that temporaril
brotherhood encourages protests. anti-morsi protesters taking over tahrir square. >> dave: and shredder, and police files used as confetti at the macy's day parade. how can it happen? is our security now at risk? >> illinois has the worst budget deficit in the nation and why is the state spending millions of taxpayer dollars on table for prisoners. >> and eco friendly zip lines, maybe they want them to watch "fox & friends" in prison, have you ever thought of that. >> dave: amen, there's some viewers, baby. >> clayton: "fox & friends" begins right now. ♪ . >> alisyn:. >> alisyn: good morning, everybody, thanks for joining us bright and early on this sunday morning, we have quite a show for you, including the ongoing debate that dave briggs launched yesterday about yoga pants and we invite you to weigh in this morning. >> clayton: you're still leading this fight and championing this fight. >> alisyn: he's made it a platform. >> dave: i may run for the white house based on yoga pants. there's both good and bad and we will delve into this later on and look, common ground. it's unlike pol
strong-man presidency under hosni mubarak. many people today say say president morsi is creating for himself a new dictatorship. reza sayah is in cairo right now. do these protesters have a point? is this the same style of leadership that triggered the arab spring? >> if you ask the protesters if they have a point, they'll give you an emphatic yes. these are demonstrators who believe the revolution, the principles of the 2011 revolution is in jeopardy, and they believe its current president mohammed morsi who has put those principles in jeopardy. all this outrage and fury as the outcome of a set of decrees suddenly announced on thursday night. these give them sweeping powers and it seems to be an effort to push through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few
in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close election and the other choice may have been a more democratic choice. people were searching for new leadership and they ended up with this muslim brotherhood path mohamed morsi. what are the charges he's interested in compromise? >> reporter: he has shown no signs of making a concession. the opposition says they will stay put in tahrir square. they say they won't negotiate until the president makes a complete stepdown.
the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the new york times" you can actually see the turnaround in president obama's thinking about morsi. it started out to be mistrustful of him but warming up to him the more he worked with the guy and frankly the mor
to the government in egypt, the president mohamed morsi, that they would stop firing into israel. if that were to be revoked, that would be a violation. they would be breaking their word to the egyptians and that would cause some serious repercussions i assume, christiane, between the egypt government, muslim brotherhood-led government, and hamas. >> reporter: well, i was obviously talking about what's the perspective from this side was. but of course israel's demand was that there would be no more rockets and no more of that fire going into israel. that was something they really wanted. and of course israel does not want to see hamas resupplied through the tunnel network. that is still to be worked out. i asked him whether or not he got weapons and whether hamas was getting weapons from iran, and he gave me a non-confirmation confirmation. it's an open secret that they come through those tunnels. so that has to be taken in hand. we're not sure how that's going to happen, but obviously there is some egyptian role in that as well. but, yes, egypt is the guarantor of this cease-fire. neither sid
/2 today. >> and some like to shop in bunny slippers. >> and fret mohammed morsi granting himself extra powers. >> sending the country's stock market into free fall. >> buy a ticket for this wednesday's powerball lottery, you could win in the megaball. >> bradshaw with the touchdown. >> giants tommenate. >> officially a time-out. >> cheerleaders shave their head to support the coach diagnosed with leukemia. >> and all that matters -- >> suddenly changes into the -- 6. >> anybody want to top that now? >>> on cbs "this morning." >>> the rolling stones marked their 50th anniversary with a concert in london and head to the united states next month. ♪ hey, you, get out of my path ♪ you know when i'm going, out of my path ♪ captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to cbs increases and automatic spending cuts that would start in january. >>> this morning there are new signs both sides may be willing to compromise. major garrett is at the white house. his first report as cbs news - white house correspondent. major welcome and good morning. >> reporter: good morning, c
years after the signs in cairo they look the same. mohamed morsi moves for absolute power sparking violent clashes in the streets between his supporters and opponents. but first, it is time to check stocks as would every 15 minutes, let's head to the floor of the new york stock exchange. nicole, the market is down and out on the fiscal cliff. i'm afraid. nicole: there's a lot going on on wall street. selling across the board, down 72-point at the lowest .12900, so about 40 points off of the earlier lows, however we are seeing selling from sector to sector with its banks or drugs or retail. the areas that have been pretty good our technology, semi conductors holding on, utilities giving it a go after selling off on concerns of the fiscal cliff of his utilities is a group that paid high dividends and that would be taxed heavily, however they are also viewed as a safe haven, that is why you see investments they are. after a winning week last week. the dow component mcdonald's downgraded today to neutral from a buy. mcdonald's selling off, and those are some of the top stories on wall
with egyptian president morsi in cairo right now just hours after the bombing of an israeli passenger bus. secretary clinton issued this statement on the bombing -- "the united states strongly condemns this terrorist attack and our thoughts and prayers are with the victims and the people of israel." let me bring in congressman steve israel, a democrat from new york, and chair of the democratic congressional campaign committee. congressman, good morning. >> good morning, chris. >> u.n. representative cole sent a letter to president morsi asking him to refrain from giving hamas cover to intensify its attacks by allowing egyptian delegations to visit gaza. of course, morsi has been a major player in these truce negotiations. do you think he's sending a mixed message? >> well, he is sending a mixed message. you know, i hope that president morsi is able to play a constructive role. but when high-level delegations of egyptians go into gaza under the pretense of a cease-fire and then terrorist groups violate that cease fire, if israel were to defend itself and members of the delegation was tragi
morsi. they said they won't return to work until morsi rescinds decrees giving himself near absolute power. at the same time, the supreme constitutional court rejected morsi's claims that it's undermining his government. >> ( translated ): the egyptian supreme constitutional court will not be terrorized from any threat or blackmail and it will not be subjected to any pressure from anyone, no matter how forcible the pressure. and the supreme constitutional court is ready to face this, whatever the consequences, which could be a high price, even if the price is the life of its judges. >> sreenivasan: the courts' actions came a day after nationwide protests against morsi's decrees. and late today, there was word the egyptian leader will address the country tomorrow about his actions and the response. rebels in eastern congo have begun pulling out of territory they seized from government troops just last week. neighboring countries had issued an ultimatum for the m-23 fighters to withdraw from the key town of goma by friday. the group is made up mainly of soldiers who deserted the congol
asking you about what's going on in egypt right now where muhammad morsi must feel pretty emboldened after playing such a crucial role in helping to broker a ceasefire between's reel and hamas. -- between israel and hamas. he is now sort of changing the law of the land, a power grab. how's this going to work out? is. >> well, i think he's revealed his true stripes. this is not democracy in action, this is a classic effort at one person, one vote, one time. he's, obviously, met resistance. let's hope it's successful. but i think it's just highly ironic that after dozens of commentators left and right in this country hailed muhammad morsi for his responsible conduct with respect to gaza and how he wasn't acting like an an extremist from the muslim brotherhood got what he, got what he needed from the ceasefire agreement and immediately began acting like an extremist from the muslim brotherhood. that should be what we focus on going forward. and for anybody who thinks the ceasefire in gaza is durable, all they had to do was read these headlines about what morsi did in egypt the day after
is in cairo tonight. >> attempts by egypt president morsi to expand his powers have galvanized the oppositio opposition. in to the largest street protest since those that helped overthrow the former president hosni mubarak two years ago. >> the protesters are a mix. young and old. secular and nationalists. joined for the moment by one emotion. anger. the egypt's first democratically elected president overstepped the bounds and trying to become exactly what they fought so hard to get rid of. a dictator. >> they are great control. appreciate the culture in their own image of muslim brothers. they are not hiding it. it's not that. they are doing it, secretly. >> mohammed morsi's attempt at compromise meeting with the chief judges in cairo, giving verbal assurances that the sweeping powers would only be temporary and limited to unspecified sovereign matters has done nothing to stem unrest. schools and many businesses were closed today due to demonstrations. planned march by muslim brotherhood in support of mohammed morsi was canceled to reduce the chance of conflict between the two sides. >> opp
in gaza more than a decade now. the big test here is whether or not president morsi of egypt is able to have more of a relationship with hamas to bring hamas along with a reconciliation, bring them to the table than mubarak ever was because hamas is an outgrowth or a spiritual kin with the muslim brotherhood which is where morsi comes from historically, whereas hamas was an enemy of mubarak and had a situation where neither israel nor egypt has wanted to take responsibility for what's going on in gaza city so it's not like morsi wants to take responsibility for gaza but sponsoring the peace and i think slowly but surely he wants to bring hamas along to show the world that he's a guy that can deal with hamas, bring hamas to the table, present some sort of detente between egypt, hamas and israel. >> the palestinian people and who is in gaza and, guys, showing the map one more time, the geography to get the visual here, this is gaza, the gaza strip. it's basically twice the size of washington, d.c. with over 1.5 million people crammed in to the borders and hamas in civilian neighborhood
is a plus. gregg: are you surprised at how helpful the new islamist government of muhammad morsi really was in this process as a mediator standing up for the truce, probably pressuring hamas and, of course, their benefactor? are you surprised at what they did? yeah. i think it's a pleasant surprise. i mean, this is not the government we would have wanted in egypt post-mubarak because they are muslim brotherhood, and there's parts of the muslim brotherhood that is totally alien to us, the salafist movement which are radical islamists, but here he is openly sporting hamas, but at the same time brokering a deal. part of the motivation is the relationship with the united states, the aid that he receives from us on a regular basis -- gregg: 3.5 billion a year -- 1.5 billion a year. >> and i think a lot the criticism will be sub sued. gregg: money often talks in that part of the world. egypt claims it has intercepted and stopped truckloads of missile warheads headed for gaza. is that a single sl jewish tear gesture or the real deal? >> they probably have, but this is the toughest part of the
square in cairo after the new egyptian president morsi gave himself sweeping new powers today. tahrir square also the heart of last year's uprising. demonstrators filled the streets of alexandria later today. morsi's new powers put his own decisions above all legal challenges until a new egyptian parliament is elected. despite the protests, morsi moving ahead with his plans at the same time insisting that his new powers are for the good ofu issued a statement moments ago saying in part, quote, we call for calm and encourage all parties to work together and call for all egyptians to resolve their differences over these important issues peacefully and through democratic dialogue. jim maceda will join us coming up in 20 minutes right here. >>> turning from egypt now to the border between israel and gaza where a two-day cease fire is already being tested. israeli troops shot and killed a 20-year-old man on the gaza side of the line today. the first death since the truce. nbc news reporting that the man was trying to get to his family farm. we have coverage from both sides of the border to
mitchell. andrea, this is because president morsi has seized power, a day after brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas, he is now consolidating power. how worry side the administration about it? >> very worried, but they are very, very cautious because he is their new point of leverage really with hamas. he is the future, they thought, of trying to negotiate something and revive the israeli-palestinian talks. and now suddenly he seizes power. he was looking for this opportunity. he is threatened by the judiciary and the other mubarak forces who have, he believes, stopped the constitutional process and stymied that. but for him to do this now, at his point of greatest authority, puts the administration in a bind. and it's unclear how this is going to resolve. >> david brooks, there's a larger strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term that's got to be dominated by this region. >> i think so. it's the middle east, so there's good news and bad news. the good news is that the obama administration did an excellent job of supporting
in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed morsi, it is a big test for the new leader. steve harrigan is live in cairo. some are saying that mohammed morsi is the real winner here. you have all sides facing the same person. americans giving him high marks for his mediation, even some israeli officials praising the president. as far as the mediation goes, there were some concerns about which direction he would say, a long-term member of the muslim brotherhood and a public sympathizer of hamas. and in the end, he worked closely with u.s. officials about that days of violence. he had all those conversations with president obama. >> we are wondering. he is trying to change the constitution and give themselves more power. what can you tell us about that? >> some dramatic developments which have just occurred in the last hours, and we have had four days of protests. they could be extremely large tomorrow. what the egyptian president has done is basically said that no one can overrule any of his decrees since he became president in june. not even the courts. he also said any of those guilty
east. but i think that it's remarkable, alex, really, to see the kind of praise that president morsi is receiving. even in those defiant speeches that ayman was referring to, hamas leaders, islamic jihad leaders, benjamin netanyahu's comments last night, secretary clinton's comments last night, president obama's praise, everybody has good things to say about morsi, who has now emerged not only as a can-do politician, but a power broker in the region. for instance, when the truce deal needed to be closed and clinton came to cairo, she spent hours with morsi and with his foreign minister, mohammed kamul, finding the compromise that israel and hamas could live with. mainly stop the hostilities today and negotiate the other demands later. alex? >> jim, thank you very much for that live report from cairo with the latest on the brokering of the truce. joining me now, former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. for special affairs, stewart is a special assistant to the president and is currently president and ceo of the nonpartisan meridian international center in washington. welcome, stewart, thank
was immiment to the political crisis over president morsi's decision to grant himself sweeping pours, a move that's touched days of street violence. president morsi says the move is temporary and he plans to meet with the country's supreme judicial council. supporters and opponents of the president are planning big protests tomorrow. >>> 7:15. united states supreme court gets involved in the historic gay marriage debate this week. ktvu's alison burns in our washington, d.c. newsroom with the cases now facing the court. alison? >> reporter: dave, the justices will meet behind closed doors to decide whether to take up any of the cases related to same-sex marriage this week. now, tops among those cases, of course, california's proposition 8, the 2008 voter- approved ban on same-sex marriage. if the court decides not to take up a challenge to proposition 8, that means gay and lesbian couples would legally be able to legally marry in california right away. the justices are also considering whether to take up challenges to the federal law that defines marriages between a man and a woman. legal ana
morsi's power grab. police firing tear grass at demonstrators. this is one of the highest courts refuses to work in protest with mohamed morsi's degree. president obama will hhve a sitdown with crummy tomorrow. their first sit down since the election november 6. tonight's record-breaking powerball jackpot is now up to $550 million. people lining up across the country for their chance to hit it big. if you think you're going to become an instant millionaire, here's a sobering stat. the odds are one in 175 million. those are your headlines. back to you. lori: thank you. melissa: are you sharing your lottery winnings with me? lori: yesterray i was on the fence, but i've decided i should be generous. melissa: in the summer knight capital was fighting for it survival after aaron's trading wiped out money from the balance sheet. but they find themselves in the middle of a bidding war as high frequency trading outfit tries to outbid their arrival. who has the advantage? which has the advantage. >> we report, you decide. i will lay ouu a couple of things. convincing the board to accept an all ca
mohammed morsi announced far-reaching powers placing himself above any government law. that has sparked the violent clashes that he see here on the streets and dozens of protests but the country's justice minister now saying there is some sort of resolution on all of this imminent. steve harrigan joins us now streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt. what happens if they fail to reach any kind of compromise here? >> reporter: well for the past four days
. >> white house criticizing president morsi. would you say that was incorrect statement? >> i would say that we are concerned about it and raised those concerns are you receiving a payout from a legal settlement or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. i just finished a bowl of your new light chicken pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... ...lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i can still see you. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may
-year-old activist, and to voice their opposition to president mohamed morsi and the muslim brotherhood. this ireport showing protesters as they carried the teenager's casket through tahrir square to a cemetery. morsi declared the court cannot overturn decisions he has made since coming into office in june. one opponent says it can only lead to a dictatorship. morsi insists that he is trying to protect egypt's fragile arab spring, revolution, not accumulate unchecked power. >>> and if you're traveling through the northeast today, well, you might be dealing with a little bit of snow. meteorologist alexandra steele is in for rob marciano today. what are we looking at, alexandra? >> hey, good morning to you guys. yeah, we are seeing snow, even in new york city. all the big cities, boston, new york, philadelphia, a little snow. not much in the way of accumulation, really along the big cities and the 95 corridor, but still you'll see it come down. kind of get new the christmas spirit. we do have winter weather advisories and we will see accumulati accumulations. want to show you where. here'
, opponents rallied against mohamed morsi, he met with the senior judges monday trying to quiet the dispute over his effort to assume near absolute power. holly williams is in cairo. good morning holly. >> reporter: good morning, charlie and norah. he met with several senior judges and told them that one of his new powers immuneity from the court would only apply to sovereign matters. the problem is that we don't know exactly what that means. it certainly won't satisfy his opponents. they're holding a large demonstration today in tahrir square, right behind me. you'll remember the square from last year's egyptian revolution which ousted the country's long-time dictator. one of the organizers of today's demonstration told me he is expecting half a million people. that seems ambitious. at the moment there are only a few thousand people out. some of president's morsi's supporters were planning a gathering but canceled that because they were afraid of clashes. we may see more violent confrontations as we have over the last few days. norah, charlie? >> holly, thanks. >>> hum
as the appeals report suspends work to protest the decrease that gave mohammed morsi near absolute powers. steve harrigan is live in cairo with the very latest, steve. >> those protestors are out again for the 6th night in a row at tahrir square scuffling with police. we've seen exchanges of rocks and teargas on both sides, several protestors coming away injured, police injured as well. nowhere near the numbers we saw last night where as many as 200,000 demonstrators were in the square. they are demanding not only that the president pull back on his decrease but the entire government gets toppled. judges from two of the courts including the appeals court has gone on strike. they say they are not going to work again until the president takes a step back. we are seeing no comprises from president mohammed morsi. in fact we are hearing from his supporters in the muslim brotherhood that they plan on staging major marchs across the nation on saturday in support of mohammed morsi. they have kept their distance perhaps trying to reduce of conflict between two sides. megyn: steve harrigan thank you. new
: hundreds of thousands of egyptians protesting president obama morsy latest power grab. egypt has replaced one dictator with another. this time it is worse. brett, obama came out it was in the "new york times" saying he was impressed with the new president's confidence. a day later morsy basically the clerk himself above the law. what do you make of that? >> it is hilarious except for the fact of it is tragic for egyptians. it is very clear where this is going. it has been a constant amazement to see this administration constantly giving the brotherhood the benefit of the dow pretending it will be anything other than an organization, a 83-year-old organization. we ought to know who these guys are, how they are trained, and what they are aiming at. the administration was caught a little flat-footed, dennis. dennis: why is it that the u.s. government, the media, are we guilty of wishful thinking? >> this is actually a profound mystery. over the last few years, there have been some articles and magazines try to claim that the moslem brotherhood is a moderate organization. gerri ford was a mod
today over the decree giving new powers to morsi. ayman is live in cairo with the latest. good evening. >> reporter: good evening. tens of thousands of protestors have gathered in tahrir square. many of them saying and singing the same songs and chants in the revolution. they changed the name from mubarak to morsi. the demands are the same. many people behind me today have been galvanized by the degree cree of morsi that gave him sweeping powers, including those to legislate without judicial review. it's not just about the decree. they're disappointed with the pace of reform. they're disappointed with the new constitutional assembly writing a constitution. they say it's not pluralistic and does not represent all of egyptians, and more importantly they're angered by the police force in egypt still using the same brutal tactics they used under mubarak. there have been no reforms and no convictions of officers that killed protestors. they're coming out in large numbers behind me. that has galvanized them and even unifying them politically. president morsi and his muslim brotherhood enjoy
mohammed morsi will try to explain reasons for giving himself nearly absolute power. he and his backer notice muslim brotherhood argued he needed to do it to speed along the transition to a new government. the move has sparked new rallies which have turned violent at times. [chanting] >> shepard: meantime judges on egypt's highest court who lost their power under this decree today went on strike and say they will not return to work until the president gives up the sweeping powers that he somehow granted himself. palestinian leaders predict they are going to score historic win tomorrow when the united nations votes on whether to recognize a palestinian state. analysts expect the vote to pass and by a big majority it would grant palestine only limited understood -- statehood. against the effort it could give palestinians new leverage against israel. mahmoud abbas has said he will not negotiate with israel as long as it keeps expanding settlements in the west bank. and the israeli prime minister has refused to freeze that construction. "the fox report's" correspondent jonathan hunt is at
by president mohammed morsi. there were more clashes today. in cairo's tahrir square. police fired tear gas at some of the demonstrators. some of them through the can -- threw canisters back at police. >> iran is showcasing several additions to the navy. missile firing warship launched today near the strait of hormuz. they took liberty of two submarines and hovercrafts. the country nuclear chief says uranium enrichment will move ahead with intensity. he says there will be a sharp increase in number of centrifuges used to make the nuclear fuel. at least 34 people were killed today in twin suicide car bombings in the syrian capital. state media say the bombs ripped through a parking lot near a cluster of commercial buildings in a damascus suburb. rebels are claiming they shot down a syrian air force jet today as well. international momentum may be building for the latest move by palestinians. to get united nations recognition. david lee miller on what the u.s. intends to do. >> on the streets of ramallah, on the west bank. posters can already be seen exclaiming state of palestine, member of t
that won't happen anytime soon. let's move over to egypt. we see muhamed morsi, head of the government denouncing the judiciary no longer exists. novelty is he taking power for his government betty essentially taking power from any independent judiciary used to have. it wasn't too long ago in the arabs spring a year-and-a-half ago when some were saying the muslim brotherhood didn't want power at all. let's play a clip of somebody who said that from nbc. >> the muslim brotherhood doesn't really want to take over. you would never see -- i can't imagine you would ever see muslim brotherhood president of egypt. they like to rule from the back. they like to control the student unions, the people who clean the streets, the teachers, the lawyers union. dave: they are not interested in power. a little editorializing by me in february and february of 2011. richard angle is presented by nbc as the man who knows what is going on behind the scenes in the middle east. for him to say back then that the muslim brotherhood would not take over when they have done what they did today which is not only t
as president morsi says, he is in charge. okay, he's got to be responsible. no more rhetoric. no more siding with one side. he's got to make the thing work. that's what we want to see as responsible leadership. not id logical leadership. >> that's a great point. let me ask you, something unresolved, in this peace treaty or truce, is the issue of gaza and its borders, which borders up into egypt. now the hamas, they want israel to pull the military out. and have a complete opening of the borders. into egypt. general clark, doesn't that open the door, if that ever happened, to iranians rearming, rearming three egypt, through the sinai, rearming hamas just like they always do. >> of course, and israel can't permit that and shouldn't permit that. this is where egypt has to step up and say, we will insure that no weapons get back into gaza. that has to be worked out in stages and demonstrated. it has to be checked and verified. and israel has a continuing interest and should have a continuing right to verify that. >> do you think, general, serious, do you think that hamas, i hope i'm not being to
morsi, a man we've seen at rallies where egyptians chan egyptians chanted we are hamas. it's an impressive feat and the first time that israel has ever negotiated with an islamist government. but there are some shady things about the deal. according to an israeli newspaper, neither side officially signed penned to paper on the cease-fire agreement which raise sometimes questions about it. and here's what we know is in the verbal deal. israel has agreed to hold its fire and end attacks against top militants and this is important, promise to look at ways to ease its blockade of the gaza border. hamas agreed not to strike any israeli targets and agreed there is no passage of weapons into gaza and to insure other palestinian groups in the gaza strip stop their attacks. if you're shaking your head that some of these things are very tall order, well, you're right. later "out front" we have the key players, israel's foreign deputy minister and leerd of the plo to the united states. they will be our guests and answer those questions. but cnn's ben wheatamen is live with the latest
president mohammed morsi stood by his decision to essentially give himself complete control over egypt. he says it's only temporary. you may recall last week he issued several decrees. including an order that all decisions he makes are final. and one that states no legislature and no court can overturny law that he makes. if that sounds like a dictatorship to you, it does to these people, too. they are pro-democracy protesters who have responded to days of clashes that have led to one death and hundreds of injuries. all of this less than two years after a popular uprising ousted hosni mubarak. the white house has not spoken with the ejimtion counter part since his power grab but they are keeping a close eye on the situation. >> we have raised concerns. i think the state department put out a statement on this or new one addressed it in a briefing. i think the state department might have more information for you on, you know, specifically how we have communicated those concerns. but, you know, our interest is in the process, the transition towards democracy. >> shepard: also today secretary
a decree by president morsi. now back to "hardball." >>> back to "hardball." u.s. congressman tom cole of oklahoma signaled republicans should accept president obama's tax offer. earlier today the president made note of it. let's listen. >> i'm glad to see, if you've been reading the papers lately, that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so, if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. >> congressman, thank you for joining us tonight. give us your thinking about why it's important, i know politically it makes sense to many people, middle class, people making up to $250,000 a year, get the tax cut continued but people above are basically decoupled from that much larger group of people. >> well, chris, i don't think taxes ought to go up for anybody. i think it's bad economic policy. it will eventually cost us jobs and eventually slow the economy. that's going to cost us revenue as well. i don't agree with the president on that point. frankl
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